Monthly Archives: November 2014

Tree Inventory Intern

me

With a love for nature, erectile geography and the world around us, I graduated from Brock University with a Bachelor of Arts in Geography and a Bachelor of Education with a Basic Qualification in Junior/Intermediate divisions with a teachable in Geography. This past fall, I returned to academia and earned a Graduate Certificate in Geographic Information Systems/Geospatial Management from Niagara College, and shortly after acquired a temporary internship with the City of Welland. (more…)

A quick glimpse into my working world

Being the only GIS professional in my section means not only having all the responsibilities pertaining to GIS but also being the person that staff tend to go to for IT/computer help, graphic design, website maintenance, automation processes and database support.

Examples of my day-to-day tasks include providing technical support for GIS applications; creating specialized maps; assisting with GPS units; digital file management; supporting network connections to local servers; editing schematic drawings using graphic software; attending a teleconference on changes being made to our corporate web pages. Current larger projects involve Python scripting in ArcMap; uploading local spatial data to the geospatial depository; managing an Oracle database project and coordinating the development digital PDF smart forms.

As I was writing this, I was called upon three times. A couple inspectors asked for some computer help, our Chief Geologist needed assistance on an ArcMap procedure and our Chinese Intern needed me to continue training him on creating and distributing data for Water Static Level Maps.

I work in London, Ontario, Canada as the Data Management Specialist at a section of the provincial government that regulates the drilling, production and plugging of oil, gas and salt related wells. My job gives me much pride, is continually evolving and is full of technical tasks and projects. Awesome.

Hope this quick and casual blog entry provided a small insight into my working life. Next I think I’ll work on requests to enhance our customized ArcMap application…

A Little Insight Into the Life of an Urban Planner

Submitted via email from Denise – Urban Planner

At the young age of 17 I knew that my dad was a planner, viagra sale what exactly that meant I was not too sure. When it came time to apply for post-secondary, pill I had not put too much thought into what programs I would apply for; I just knew I wanted to go to university. Sports and hanging out with my friends was top of mind during my high school years, not what I wanted to be so many years down the road. (more…)

Niagara Region: Student Planner

My name is Alexander Morrison, viagra and I am a Student Planner working within the Community and Long Range Planning Department at the Niagara Region.

To provide a brief background about myself, stuff I am fourth year student attending the University of Waterloo. I am enrolled in the Faculty of Environment’s Co-op Planning program, medicine minoring in Geography and Environmental Management.  I have taken several university courses that have incorporated the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) programs into various assignments and projects. To date, I have completed two co-op work terms and am currently involved in my third work term with the Niagara Region.

For my first two co-op terms, I worked as a Cartographic Technologist Assistant at the Ministry of Transportation Ontario (MTO). My tasks at the MTO primarily involved researching and updating geographic coordinates on a variety of datasets for use on the Ontario Road Map and creating Photogrammetric Contract Maps for contractor bidding purposes. The tasks often required in-depth use of computer programs such as ArcGIS, AutoCAD and Google Earth, as these programs included a variety of tools that were used to define data attribute queries and conduct a variety of spatial analyses.

While my tasks at the Niagara Region differ from the MTO, I have discovered that I still encounter GIS within my daily tasks. For example, for the large majority of the day, I have been collecting information from the Niagara Region’s Greenbelt Plan Review and comparing it to another Region’s Greenbelt Review. From my research, I have come across a variety of maps that display the extent of the Greenbelt and the Municipalities and Regions within it. I was also able to find datasets that displayed features such as roads, rails, highways, trails, property boundaries, and water features just to name a few. The collected GIS datasets and attributes provide insight as to the challenges and opportunities that both Regions face in association to the Greenbelt.

The rest of my day has consisted of reviewing proposal applications for Niagara Region’s Public Art Policy. My task is to ensure that the proposals are complete and consistent to the objectives envisioned by the Niagara Region. For each proposal, I must fill out an evaluation check list that is broken down into weighted categories. I must also provide comments for my reasoning of evaluation, as well as on areas that I believe are reflective of Niagara Region’s policy objective, or any components of the proposal that are unclear. I must also consider how the proposal methodology expects to achieve successful implementation of innovative, collaborative and creative public engagement strategies.

The best thing about the geospatial world

One of the great things about the geospatial world is the variety. Anything that can be related to a location is spatial (and when you think about it, that’s almost everything), which means that there’s practically no limit to the opportunities. Science, business, economics, government, politics, engineering and more are fields that make more and more use of geomatics. With geography, you can work in government; you can work in the private sector; you can work in academia. It can be the focus of your career or it can be a complementary tool. You can spend most of your time outdoors or all of it in an office. There’s a technical side to it and there’s a creative side. In my geomatics career, I’ve experienced most of the above and I wouldn’t have it any other way.

Chris Beasy, Senior GIS Project Manager

Chartwell Consultants Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia

How I Became a Geographer

To tell the story about how I became a geographer and what I do every day today, I feel the need to first explain how I first came to the subject, and what geography means to me.

I actually came to geography by chance. Following high school, I was trained as a chemist for a couple of years. At the age of 20 when came the time for me to specialize further, I wanted two things: I wanted to work in biochemistry and I wanted to do research. However, at the time I thought that my grades were not high enough to follow this career path, and so instead I decided a complete change of field – entering a geographic science school. I thought that maps were cool, so why not learn how to make them? (more…)

Student: Brock University

Before I begin discussing my day, I’d like to describe my educational background.  In 2011 I began my first year of study as a Human Geography student at Brock University.  I attended Niagara College last year as part of a joint program between Brock and Niagara College and earned a post-graduate certificate in GIS-Geospatial Management. This was a great decision because I gained a lot of hands on experience working with GIS software and learning about the many applications that are involved with GIS.  Plus, I will end up with a Bachelors Degree and a Post-Graduate Certificate after four years as opposed to five.  While at Niagara College, I discovered that GIS presents a wide variety of employment opportunities and that I enjoyed the field very much.  As a result, I found my career path for when I finish my studies at Brock this coming April. (more…)

Events at Western

Geography Awareness Week November 17-21, hospital 2014

Submitted by Kathy Tang via dayofgeography@gmail.com

This year, Western University’s Department of Geography is inspiring future learners throughout Geography Awareness Week! The Department invited local high schools to discover their world through the use of Geographic Information Systems and explore its benefits and significance throughout our everyday lives. (more…)

Geospatial Niagara – Day of Geography – Sir Winston Churchill Secondary School

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Sir Winston Churchill Selfie

Well today is the day!!! Day of Geography! The first one ever and definitely not the last.

Geospatial Niagara created Day of Geography but was inspired by the Archaeological community’s “Day of Archaeology“. The story of why, how, when can be found in the “About the Project” section.

Today was a special day because myself and six other colleagues had the fortune of making a presentation to approximately 100+ Grade 9 Geography students at a local high school – Sir Winston Churchill. Joining me on stage were Jean Tong – Director of K-12 Education at ESRI Canada, Kevin Turner – Physical Geography Professor at Brock University, Colleen Beard – Head of the Map, Data & GIS Library at Brock University, Teresa Alonzi and Amber-Lynn Schmucker from the Brock University Geographical Society and Janet Finlay – Program Coordinator of the Niagara College GIS and Geospatial Management Program.

I’d like to thank Kristen Salvas and Melanie Bourque from the Sir Winston Churchill Geography Department for making this happen. They capitalized on this event and we are very thankful. They were the first high school to take part in what I hope Geospatial Niagara can do every year, and that is bringing the possibilities of Geography to students, not only on Day of Geography but throughout the year as well

SirWinstonI am aware that there was another high school Day of Geography event and that was in Waterloo at the Waterloo Collegiate Institute being put on by my colleague Dr. Amanda Hooykaas.

The presentation began with a Jean Tong walking about what resources the students could access immediately and showed examples of various types of story maps. Thus began a journey through their education from high school through to university and post secondary education.

Next up came Kevin talking about some of the course offerings at Brock University and about his own research pertaining to climate change and its impacts in the Far North.

Colleen Beard guided the students through the Map, Data and GIS library site, illustrating some of the student created maps as well as the excellent War of 1812 Google Maps Presentation.

Teresa Alonzi and Amber-Lynn Schmucker, both from the Brock University Geographical Society (BUGS) talked about their experiences in the geography program. Interestingly enough neither of them began with geography at Brock, they found geography and switched their majors. They had found their calling.

Janet Finlay from Niagara College talked to the students about the GIS/Geospatial Management Program and about all the work (and the rewards) that entails.

The presentation wrapped up with me discussing Geospatial Niagara. What we’re all about, out vision, mission and goals.

We wrapped up with a little bit of a question period from the students which included one of my favourite questions to answer. “Why did you choose geography?”…. For me, I had some amazing teachers all the way through grade school to high school and university/college. In the long run I don’t think I chose geography. Geography chose me. But the educators that I had refined my vision and increased my passion for the subject to areas I had no idea about.

I encourage everyone professional or student, to share your love of all things geo. If you are in high school, share it with those in younger grades. If you are in college or university visit your old high school or grade school. Pay it forward…

And now the planning begins for Day of Geography 2015 – November 16, 2015 to make it bigger and better.

Cheers!